Interactive Fiction: Read it, write it, share it!

Anyone who attended the excellent “Writing for Games” talk last Saturday as part of the Dublin Writers Festival will remember the writers (Rob Morgan, Antony Johnston and Joe Griffin) onstage talking about the rise in literary games. While “literary video games” may seem like an oxymoron to the uninitiated, personal experience attests that they really are out there, and one tiny branch of this mighty tree holds the games classified as “interactive fiction.” On this delightfully sunny day in Ireland, I’d like to open a window into the world of interactive fiction for you:

So, what is interactive fiction?
In the struggle for a definition, an easy gateway is to think of interactive fiction today as the evolution of choose-your-own-adventure books that many children of the 1980s will remember. That is, interactive fiction tells a story that changes depending on the choices you make during your reading of it. This makes interactive fiction a fertile ground for many types of experimental writing and intensely personal explorations in which themes of sex and identity feature strongly.

Over the past few years, the global game development community has latched onto the potential of interactive fiction, especially as a “gateway drug” into game design. We can find visual novels, hypertext fiction and more complex forms that use player text input to determine the next steps of the game … and all of these can be classified as interactive fiction. To ease our way in, we’ll focus on hypertext fiction for today. As I’ll show you later, the most popular tools for creating hypertext fiction are free and so simple that a novice user can create and publish their first game within a day.

I’d like to read some interactive fiction, where should I start?
My interests skew experimental, so I’m going to point you towards three of my favourites in that arena (all are free and playable/readable in your browser without the need to download anything):
Howling Dogs” by Porpentine
Sacrilege” by Cara Ellison
Even Cowgirls Bleed” by Christine Love
Of course, there is so much out there across all genres, that the pieces that speak to me may not resonate with you at all, in which case you can take a look at Emily Short’s comprehensive list that will help you to find a piece that speaks to what you personally are interested in.

OK, I like this! How can I get started and make some interactive fiction myself?
The most popular entry-level tool is called Twine. It’s free, open-source, works on both PC and Mac and is relatively simple to use. By simple, I mean that if you are familiar with using Microsoft Word and have any experience at all with HTML/code, the learning curve is not steep. You create branching stories in a diagrammatic way, and when you are ready to publish, you can upload your game or story as a simple HTML file either to your own website, or for free on Philome.la.

Once you have a basic grasp of Twine and are bitten by the interactive fiction bug, there are many other established formats for creating more complex interactive fiction, including Ren’py, Inform and ChoiceScript. There’s also a wonderful new way of creating graphical interactive fiction called Fungus, created by Irish designer Chris Gregan who has put the time into creating some seriously helpful learning resources to help newcomers.

If you need a bit of help getting started, I’ll be teaching an interactive fiction workshop at the Circa Words experimental writing festival taking place on June 15th, so get in touch with the Irish Writers Centre if you would like to attend. After that, my friends and I held a day-long Twine-based game jam last year in Dublin and it was so much fun we are likely to run another one over the summer, so if you try Twine out and enjoy it, let me know and I’ll add you to the contact list for the event.

Can I adapt something I wrote already to interactive fiction?
Absolutely! By doing this, you can learn a new way of presenting your work in addition to increasing the chance of your work being read by others. Creating interactive fiction is free, easy and brings immersive, experimental writing to many people who would never buy a poetry chapbook, even if the contents are exactly the same. To show this, check out the contrasting experiences of Dan Waber (who wrote “A Kiss“), between the response he got to the same work via literary journals versus the viral promotion of it through the interactive fiction community.

I hope I’ve convinced you that giving interactive fiction a try is well worth the effort. If you do go ahead to make something in Twine, please do send it to me, I’d love to be immersed in your story!

 

 

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Tonight: Ray Davies in Conversation with Joseph O’Connor!

For all those heading to see Ray Davies speak later tonight at the National Concert Hall we hope you will have a great time and here is a tune to get your excitement levels a little higher. The Kinks released the song, “You Really Got Me”, on August 4th, 1964. Speaking in the documentary, Imaginary Man, Ray responds to a question about the song by saying, “64, the end of 64, that’s when I was born. I was literally born when that was a hit.” In that case this year will mark the fiftieth anniversary of Ray Davies’ rebirth as the artist, icon and rock legend that we have all known him as. So Happy Fiftieth Birthday, Mr. Davies!

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I’m thinking of the days…

Seeing as today is Saturday, once again we bring you a song by The Kinks. This time the song of choice is “Days” and the days we’re thinking of are the nine days left until Ray Davies will stride onto the stage at the National Concert Hall on May 19th. Remember this year Dublin Writers Festival will have an extended nine day run, from Saturday the 17th through until Sunday the 25th. We have whole host of exciting events coming up so check out our full line-up to make sure you don’t miss out. In the meantime, sit back, turn the speakers up to 11 and hit play:

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We are the Sherlock Holmes, English speaking vernacular Help save Fu Manchu, Moriarty and Dracula

We’re counting down the days until Ray Davies speaks at the National Concert Hall and for the past few Saturday’s we’ve been featuring a song from Ray’s band, The Kinks, in anticipation of the event. The first song we featured, “Waterloo Sunset”, is one of my favourite songs by the band and the song today, “The Village Green Preservation Society”, is my other favourite. Hope that you will enjoy it too. Follow this link for more information about Ray Davies’ upcoming appearance at the National Concert Hall. As an added bonus today we are also including a documentary about Ray Davies called Imaginary Man so that you can learn a little more about the rock legend before seeing him speaking about his life, work and new book, Americana: the Kinks, the Road and the Perfect Riff, live on May 19th.

EXTRA BONUS: Kate Rusby’s well executed cover of “The Village Green Preservation Society”

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Seek him here, they seek him there, In regent street and leicester square.

If it’s Ray Davies that you seek then it won’t be Regent Street or Leicester Square that you’ll find him this May 19th. Rather you can come see him at the National Concert Hall, where the rock legend and former front-man of iconic sixties band The Kinks will sit in conversation with Joseph O’Connor and read an extract from his new book, Americana: the Kinks, the Road and the Perfect Riff. It’s sure to be an event that is not to be missed so get your tickets now.

To tide you over until the day itself here’s a classic from The Kinks. The song is “Dedicated Follower of fashion” and this particular video makes use of some excellent, vintage video footage. Enjoy!

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Sunny Afternoon

Four weeks will see rock legend Ray Davies taking to the stage at the National Concert Hall, where he will sit down in conversation with Joseph O’Connor and discuss his new book, Americana: the Kinks, the Road and the Perfect Riff. Hop over here if you want to buy tickets or get more information. As we count down to the event every week we are bringing you a classic hit from The Kinks. Today’s offering is “Sunny Afternoon.” Enjoy!!!

Who is Michael Pennington?

questionMichael Pennington is a man of many talents: a potter, an actor, and a writer but is perhaps best known as a stand-up comedian. In 1996 the then unknown Pennington appeared as a contestant on the ITV game show Win, Lose or Draw and mentioned that he was a stand-up comedian. He also mentioned the stage name he performed under, a name that would soon propel Pennington Continue reading